Aboveground-Belowground Linkages: Biotic Interactions, Ecosystem Processes, and Global Change (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)

Aboveground-Belowground Linkages: Biotic Interactions, Ecosystem Processes, and Global Change (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution)

Description

Aboveground-Belowground Linkages provides the most up-to-date and comprehensive synthesis of recent advances in our understanding of the roles that interactions between aboveground and belowground communities play in regulating the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems, and their responses to global change. It charts the historical development of this field of ecology and evaluates what can be learned from the recent proliferation of studies on the ecological and biogeochemical significance of aboveground-belowground linkages. The book is structured around four key topics: biotic interactions in the soil; plant community effects; the role of aboveground consumers; and the influence of species gains and losses. A concluding chapter draws together this information and identifies a number of cross-cutting themes, including consideration of aboveground-belowground feedbacks that occur at different spatial and temporal scales, the consequences of these feedbacks for ecosystem processes, and how aboveground-belowground interactions link to human-induced global change.

Table of contents

Cover Page......Page 1
Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution......Page 2
Title Page......Page 4
ISBN 9780199546879......Page 5
Contents......Page 6
Preface......Page 10
1 Introduction......Page 12
1.1 Controls on terrestrial ecosystem processes: an historical perspective......Page 14
1.2 Species and biotic interactions as ecosystem drivers......Page 16
1.3 Abovegroundbelowground interactions as drivers of ecosystem processes......Page 19
1.4 Abovegroundbelowground interactions and global change......Page 21
1.5 Emerging issues and trends......Page 23
2.1 Introduction......Page 26
2.2.1 Free-living soil microbes, nutrient availability, and plant growth......Page 28
2.2.2 Trophic interactions in soil, nutrient availability, and plant growth......Page 34
2.2.3 Functional consequences of trophic cascades in the soil food web......Page 37
2.2.4 Bacterial-based and fungal-based energy channels and nutrient cycling......Page 39
2.3.1 Microbial symbionts and plant community dynamics......Page 43
2.3.2 Belowground pathogens, herbivores, and plant community dynamics......Page 49
2.4 Soil ecosystem engineers and plant community dynamics......Page 51
2.5 Soil biotic interactions, carbon dynamics, and global change......Page 56
2.5.1 Soil biotic interactions and ecosystem carbon exchange......Page 57
2.5.2 Contribution of soil biotic interactions to climate change via carbon-cycle feedbacks......Page 63
2.5.3 Multiple global change drivers and soil biotic interactions......Page 68
2.6 Conclusions......Page 70
3.1 Introduction......Page 73
3.2.1 Differential effects of different plant species......Page 74
3.2.2 Effects of within-species variation......Page 79
3.2.3 Spatial and temporal variability......Page 81
3.2.4 Multiple species effects......Page 83
3.3.1 Contrasting plant species and trait axes......Page 86
3.3.2 Trait dominance, trait dissimilarity, and multiple species effects......Page 92
3.3.3 Ecosystem stoichiometery......Page 95
3.4 Plantsoil feedbacks......Page 96
3.5 Succession and disturbance......Page 101
3.5.1 The build-up phase of succession......Page 102
3.5.2 Ecosystem retrogression......Page 104
3.5.3 Succession and plantsoil feedbacks......Page 108
3.6.1 Indirect belowground effects of climate change......Page 110
3.6.2 Indirect belowground effects of nitrogen deposition......Page 118
3.7 Conclusions......Page 121
4.1 Introduction......Page 124
4.2 Herbivore-mediated effects on plantsoil feedbacks and ecosystem processes......Page 125
4.2.1 Positive effects of herbivores on belowground properties and ecosystem functioning......Page 127
4.2.2 Negative effects of herbivores on belowground properties and ecosystem functioning......Page 134
4.2.3 Landscape-scale herbivore effects and multiple stable states......Page 141
4.3 The role of plant traits in regulating herbivore impacts......Page 145
4.4 Aboveground trophic cascades and consequences for belowground properties......Page 148
4.5 Spatial movement of resources by consumer organisms......Page 152
4.5.1 Resource transfers across land......Page 153
4.5.2 Resource transfers from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems......Page 158
4.6 Aboveground consumers, carbon dynamics, and global change......Page 163
4.7 Conclusions......Page 172
5.1 Introduction......Page 176
5.2.1 The diversity-function issue from an abovegroundbelowground perspective......Page 177
5.2.2 Removal experiments for studying effects of species losses......Page 183
5.2.3 Effects of species losses in real ecosystems......Page 191
5.3.1 Invasions by plants......Page 194
5.3.2 Belowground invaders......Page 201
5.3.3 Invasions by aboveground consumers......Page 206
5.4 Consequences of global change through causing species gains and losses......Page 212
5.5 Conclusions......Page 219
6.1 Introduction......Page 222
6.2.1 Linkages and feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground subsystems......Page 223
6.2.2 Organism traits as ecological drivers......Page 225
6.3.1 Drivers of variation over time......Page 228
6.3.2 Drivers of variation over space......Page 230
6.3.3 Differences across ecosystems......Page 232
6.3.4 Global-scale contrasts......Page 233
6.4 Global change phenomena......Page 235
References......Page 238
B......Page 300
C......Page 301
E......Page 302
F......Page 303
G......Page 304
L......Page 305
M......Page 306
N......Page 307
P......Page 308
Q......Page 309
S......Page 310
W......Page 312

Details

  • Author: Richard D. Bardgett, David A. Wardle
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN-10: 0199546878, 0199546886
  • ISBN-13: 9780199546879, 9780199546886
  • Pages: 312
  • Format: pdf
  • Size: 4.3M
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